What Is Millet & How Do You Cook It?

What Is Millet & How Do You Cook It?

Feb 26th 2019

 

If you like browsing through new recipes or are getting into healthier cooking, you may have started seeing recipes that use millet. This food isn't prevalent in the United States, but it's starting to get more and more attention.

But what is millet, and why should you eat it? Below, we'll talk about what millet is, the benefits of adding it to your diet and some ideas on how you can start using it more in the kitchen.

What Is Millet Used For?

You may frequently see "millet seeds" instead of just "millet" while you're at a grocery store or online. But, millet isn't a seed at all — it's a grain. It's actually similar to rice and quinoa in some ways, but it has its own unique taste. Millet is closest in taste to quinoa but has a texture like couscous. Compared to other grains, it does have a slightly more nutty flavor. But, like any grain, it easily takes on the flavors of the foods it's cooked with.

Millet isn't as popular in the United States as other parts of the world. While it's becoming more popular among the more health-conscious in the United States, the grain has been a popular food in Asia and Africa for thousands of years.

What Are the Health Benefits of Millet?

Like other grains, millet is a versatile food. Once you begin trying out new ways to use it, it may just become one of your new favorite ingredients!

Many people use millet as an alternative to other grains that have gluten because millet is naturally gluten-free. If you have a gluten allergy or intolerance, you can grind down millet to use as a substitute for wheat. This unique grain has similar amounts of protein as other grains and also contains many essential nutrients and minerals, including zinc, iron, magnesium, potassium and more.

Even though millet does have lots of health benefits, you have to eat it in moderation. Eating millet too often can actually be harmful to your health.

How to Cook Millet

You cook millet similarly to how you would make rice. Simmer the millet on the stovetop in water for about 20 to 25 minutes. Cook it a little bit longer to give it a creamier texture, like a porridge. You can also grind it down to make millet flour to use as a substitute.

Eat it with sauteed vegetables, coat chicken or fish with it and find all kinds of other ways to eat this unique grain. You'll find tons of different recipes online that teach you how to cook and enjoy millet.

If you want to start using millet, you may not find it at your standard grocery store. Because it still isn't as popular in the United States, you may have to visit a few stores to find it. You can avoid shopping around town by buying the exact quantities of millet you need at Sincerely Nuts! We have an excellent variety of other seeds and grains, too, as well as dried fruit, nuts and more.

Buy smaller quantities to give it a try at first, then order in bulk, so you're stocked up and ready to try all kinds of new and delicious dishes using millet. Plus, we offer free shipping on orders of $60 or more!

Shop Millet Seeds